Caregiver

As people get older, one of the important aspects is to continue choosing healthy foods and enjoying eating as a social activity. For people of all ages, especially the elderly, nutritional requirement is a must. Imbalance of nutrition in the elderly can occur due to either an excess or lack of nutrient consumption. This lack or excess consumption of nutrients is called malnutrition.

Malnutrition is increasingly becoming a very common health problem among the elderly population. Unfortunately, it has not received the importance it deserves.

Malnutrition can negatively impact the health of the elderly and hence, it is an important to address and resolve it as soon as it is identified. The negative impact of malnutrition include illness such as increased infection, electrolyte imbalances, altered skin integrity, anaemia, weakness, fatigue, longer stays in hospital, inability to perform regular activities, physical complications and death

Loss of appetite and unintentional weight loss are the main signs of malnutrition. Other signs may include dull and dry hair, dryness of the eye, receding gums, mental confusion, sensory loss and motor weakness. Malnutrition is prevalent in 5-10% of elderly people, majority of whom are hospitalised (about 60%) or long-term care facilities (35-85%) [Furman, 2006].

Should the elderly exercise?

by Angie on

Have you ever noticed that the older you are, the more aches and pains you get? Things that used to be easy to do aren’t so now? More so for your elderly folks, for some even walking to the front porch is a task on its own. Do they really need exercise in their daily routine?

The answer is a resounding YES! Just because you have reached the golden age, that does not mean that exercise takes a back seat in your life. All the more why it should be priority #1 in your daily life. After all, age is ONLY a number, you are never too old to start exercising. The only hurdle is your mind. We are so conditioned to think that when you reach the 70s and 80s, all you should be doing is spending the days sitting in a rocking chair and reading the papers. Let me tell you that this is a MYTH! It is time for a paradigm shift.

Which wheelchair do I choose?

by Angie on

When it comes to buying a wheelchair, there are so many out there in the market, it can be overwhelming. I know I was when I was looking for a wheelchair for my dad. I would sum up the experience of choosing the right wheelchair for your loved one to buying a car.

Here are the KEY points to assist you when you are shopping for a wheelchair:

  1. Durability and sturdiness
  2. Ease of use
  3. Comfort level for the user
  4. Safety features
  5. Weight
  6. Pricing
  7. Customer Service

If you are anything like me, I am sure you are baffled by the number of wheelchairs available online. Here I have given reviews of 3 different types of wheelchairs which are quite popular online.

caregiver and seniorYour parent is in the hospital and will be returning home soon. You have taken the decision to be the caregiver. But, you are absolutely clueless about being a caregiver and do not know what to prepare for your parent’s arrival from the hospital. This is a familiar scenario, isn’t it?

Through the following steps, I will guide you with the necessary preparations to be taken in your home for your loved one and on tips in being their caregiver.

STOP!!! Break that fall.

by Angie on

stop-sign-clipart-Stop-sign-clip-art-6

No one likes falling down and this is especially true for the elderly. It is their biggest nightmare and fear in life. This nightmare and fear is also scientifically supported by a study published in New England Journal of Medicine which states that up to 75% of the elderly would have had at least 2 falls within a year and the risk of morbidity and mortality due to these falls increase with age. This piece of information just enough to make fall prevention the number 1 priority for the caregivers of the elderly.

S.T.O.P = Stop, Think, Observe and Prevent

S.T.O.P is an easy to follow fall prevention program, recommended by the Gateway Geriatric Education Centre, which can assist any caregiver in preventing falls in the elderly. In this program, a caregiver has to stop and look at the environment which the elderly is in, think of how to make it fall safe, observe the elderly and their movement and prevent a potential accident from happening.

The first thing that you, as a caregiver, should do is to identify all the possible locations that accidents can take place as the elderly moves around at home ( this also applies to nursing homes)